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Were There Microwaves In The 70S?

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By the late 1970’s, technology improvements and cheaper electronic parts meant that microwave ovens became more practical and affordable. In 1986, 1 in 4 US households owned a microwave oven. By 1997, The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that a staggering 9 out of 10 American households owned a microwave oven.

By 1971, only 1% of American households owned a microwave. Part of the problem was a perceived radiation danger on the part of the cooking method. On January 4, 1970, a study was published by the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare that indicated microwaves leaked, well, microwaves.

In the October issue of General Electric News, it was estimated American families would buy 675,000 countertop microwave ovens during the last three months of 1976, at an average price of $370.

In 1986, 1 in 4 US households owned a microwave oven. By 1997, The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that a staggering 9 out of 10 American households owned a microwave oven.

When did microwaves take off?

This one is from the 1950s: They didn’t really take off until the 1960s when prices began to drop. In 1970, 40,000 microwave ovens were sold in the US, and by 1975 there were 1 million, according to research from Panasonic. In the UK they also took off in the 1970s thanks to the rise of ready-meals – today 56% of us are still using microwaves …

Microwaves have celebrated their 70th birthday! Here’s what they looked like back in the 1940s… This year microwaves are 73 years old! Back in the 1940s, microwaves were accidentally discovered by engineer Percy Spencer whilst working for the Raytheon Corporation.

Back in the 1940s, microwaves were accidentally discovered by engineer Percy Spencer whilst working for the Raytheon Corporation. The first microwaves cost £4,200-£4,500 and were the size of a modern American-style fridge-freezer. They weighed 340kgs and were around 1.8m tall.

For the keen cook, the microwave has made frozen foods and batch cooking more accessible . Enabling us to defrost foods speedily and use more shortcuts in otherwise lengthy recipes.

How fast is microwave cooking?

A. Microwave cooking is up to 8 times faster. Conventional cooking relies on the slow transfer of heat from the food surface to the inside layers. Microwave energy penetrates the food, causing the food molecules to vibrate, resulting in friction and creating heat. This heat is distributed through the food and cooks it.

A. In many cases, yes. General Electric’ furnishes a complete User’s Manual and Cookbook with each microwave oven. Included are recipes representative of all food categories. lb adapt your own recipe, you would select a similar one and use the same time and dish size stated for that particular food.

A. No. Foods cooked by microwave energy generally taste the same as when cooked conventionally. Some people say foods cooked in a microwave oven taste fresher, because the faster cooking time retains more of the natural moisture in the food.

A. No. Glass, china, ceramics, pottery, paper plates and heat resistant plastics can be used if there’s no metal in their composition or decoration. Metal tends to reflect microwave energy away from the food and should not be used unless specifically recommended in the User’s Manual and Cookbook.

A. No. General Electric’s microwave ovens are engineered to keep the microwave energy from escaping outside. Two special interlocking devices automatically shut off the oven whenever the door is opened. GE complies with all Federal Safety Performance Standards for microwave ovens set by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Rules CFR Part 78.

When was the first microwave invented?

Like much of the technology of the time, miniaturization would be decades away. The first commercial model, produced in 1947 , was dubbed the “Radarange.”. This behemoth stood almost six feet tall and weighed 750 pounds.

Consequently, popcorn became the first food to be prepared by microwave and a new cooking method was born.

Apart from Raytheon, there were other companies endeavoring to make some headway in microwave cooking. Through the 1950s and early 1960s, Franklin Manufacturing, a subsidiary of the Studebaker Automobile Company (both now defunct), succeeded in producing smaller magnetrons that could be air-cooled. This allowed for the making of smaller microwave models. Raytheon jumped on this trend and, through their newly acquired company, Amana, released the first popular countertop Radarange in 1967. It retailed for $495.00 at the time, equivalent to around $3200.00 in 2017. Still a princely sum, but much more manageable than previous iterations.

Raytheon jumped on this trend and, through their newly acquired company, Amana, released the first popular countertop Radarange in 1967. It retailed for $495.00 at the time, equivalent to around $3200.00 in 2017.

On January 4, 1970, a study was published by the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare that indicated microwaves leaked, well, microwaves. Manufacturers reacted by adopted new standards in the construction of their ovens, resulting in safer appliances and abating the public’s apprehension. Coinciding with increased safety factors, major …

Present Day. As the years progressed, the microwave has remained a perennial staple in American homes, reaching a 90% saturation rate in the US by 1997. It’s never supplanted the traditional kitchen range as the main method of food preparation, but never really needed to.

The microwave is relatively ubiquitous in today’s American kitchen. When we defrost a pork chop or reheat Chinese food from the night before, it’s an appliance that most of us take for granted. Let’s take a quick glance back at the history of this now pervasive appliance and its serendipitous beginnings.

When did microwaves start?

Models with a separate convection heating element were even more expensive. Both traditional oven makers, Creda and Belling and electronics giants Philips, Hitachi, Sanyo, Sharp and Toshiba, made microwave ovens in the 70s. For most people in the UK the microwave revolution did not begin until well into the 80s.

For most people though, they were simply too expensive. By 1979, there were a variety of microwaves on the market, priced between 150 and 400. [500 to 1400 in today’s money].

Manufacturers introduced a host of new, colourful ice cream dishes. Most types of freezer were available in the 70s: uprights, fridge freezers and chest freezers. It was common to keep large chest freezers in the garage rather than in the kitchen.

Freezers and frozen food were available in the 60s, but sales of freezers took off in the 70s. In 1970 around 100,000 were sold, which was three times as many as in 1967. By 1974, one in ten households had a freezer.

You could shop less often, buy different foods, freeze food from your own garden and eat foods that were out of season; although the most popular items people bought for their freezers in the mid 70s were peas, chips, raspberries and fish fingers . It was also common to buy large joints of meat to store in the freezer.

70s high tech household. Technology played an increasingly important part in people’s lives in the 70s. Colour television was first broadcast in the latter years of the 60s. By the 70s, the must-have accessory was a colour TV, later in the 70s, the first video recorders became available.

There were also freezer cookbooks and even a monthly magazine, ‘Home and Freezer Digest’, first published in 1973 . Editor, Jill Churchill’s vision for the new magazine was Its not just what the freezer can do for you, but what the freezer frees you to do”.

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