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Does Sugar Interfere With Probiotics?

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Probiotics, whether naturally occurring or added to foods, are affected by high-sugar environments. Certain probiotic strains have a natural acid-bile tolerance, giving these bacteria the ability to survive digestion in the intestines. Probiotics do not affect levels of the natural bacteria present in the gut.

At concentrations of a few percent, sugar doesn’t kill probiotics or any other bacteria and at that level it will feed a lot of microorganisms. However, sugar at high concentrations acts as a preservative because it osmotically “sucks” the moisture out of cells. That is why jams are called “preserves”.

Sugar doesn’t kill bacteria — they love the stuff! The problem is that sugar apparently disrupts the ability of certain beneficial bacteria to successfully colonize the gut. It also encourages bacteria to grow in the small intestines, which may lead to IBS and other problems.

Sugars present in certain yogurt products and other probiotic-containing foods apparently do not interfere with the digestive processes of good bacteria in lower parts of the small intestine, according to USProbiotics.org.

Why do probiotics survive?

This survival ability can be enhanced by the addition of sugars during food production that are easily metabolized in the human gut. The Society recommends that probiotics be regularly ingested.

The American Society of Microbiology reports that the ability of certain probiotic strains to survive passage through the intestinal tract is due to the organisms’ acid and bile tolerance 3.

The United Nation’s Food and Agricultural Organization and the World Health Organization define probiotics as “live organisms, which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host.”.

An environment rich in sugar or salt draws water from cells, causing the cell walls to break down and eventually leading to cell death. The food industry has maintained a balance between the amount of sugar needed to preserve foods and the viability of probiotics in foods.

Current research in the food industry is directed at finding foods, aside from dairy products, that will be suitable for addition of probiotics. The University of Reading reports that milk protein, lactose and other sugars influence the survival of probiotics in the gut. Adding multiple strains of probiotics to food products guarantees that some …

Yogurt & Fatty Liver Disease. Learn More. Sugars present in certain yogurt products and other probiotic-containing foods apparently do not interfere with the digestive processes of good bacteria in lower parts of the small intestine, according to USProbiotics.org.

Sugar is used as a preservative in many foods. Probiotics, whether naturally occurring or added to foods, are affected by high-sugar environments. Certain probiotic strains have a natural acid-bile tolerance, giving these bacteria the ability to survive digestion in the intestines.

How does artificial sweetener affect the gut?

The body doesn’t digest or absorb the materials directly, yet artificial sweeteners affect the composition and functionality of gut microbes, and those microbes play a critical role in digestion and overall health. When the balance of our gut microbiota is not in sync, critical functions like the absorption of certain vitamins, the breakdown of waste material, and resistance to harmful yeasts and bacteria can suffer. Furthermore, some types of FOS are derived from cane or beet sugar and since yeast uses sugar and sugar derivatives as a food source, it seems it would counteract any probiotic benefits taking a supplement that also contains a sugar derivative known to feed yeast.

One of the compelling reasons that Natren is very much opposed to prebiotics is because of the undesirable side effects of FOS, as we mentioned in one of our previous blogs, The Facts About FOS. This chemically manufactured product has unpleasant side effects that counteract the benefits that probiotics are intended to deliver. While the body does not directly digest FOS, it stimulates the bacteria that are present in the gut causing rapid fermentation in the colon that can lead to bloating, abdominal pain, copious quantities of gas, cramps and diarrhea. Probiotics are designed to provide relief for the occasional digestive upsets so why supplement them and potentially experience side effects that you’re trying to avoid?

Prebiotics are a class of simple carbohydrates that are non-digestible by humans, and are found naturally in foods such as leeks, asparagus, chicory, Jerusalem artichoke, garlic, artichoke, onion, wheat, banana, and oats, as well as soybean. However, you would need to consume a large quantity of these foods for them to have any useful prebiotic effect. Then there are the commercial or chemically engineered forms of prebiotics, like Inulin and Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS). Both of which are also non-digestible, but you should also be aware that FOS is used to make artificial sweeteners. Herein lies the problem.

That means the bad bacteria may be being fed too. In fact, some scientific studies have shown that prebiotics increase the growth of “bad” bacteria such as Klebsiella pneumoniae and other less-friendly organisms such as E. Coli and many Clostridium species. Read more about this and other Probiotic Myth’s on our resource page here.

How long does it take for probiotics to work on diabetes?

Present research data shows that probiotics can improve glucose metabolism. The effect is more powerful when the duration of the intervention is more than 8 weeks.

Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when administered in correct dosages and form, give you a ton of health benefits. Probiotic supplements have been proven to have positive effects on cardio-metabolic parameters in patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

Studies also reveal that when you eat the wrong foods and upset the balance of good bacteria in the gut, you make yourself vulnerable to several other health conditions. The wrong bacteria make your gut leaky which can, in turn, lead to toxins leaking into the blood.

Many of us are ignorant about the importance and benefits of probiotics. Probiotics, or good gut bacteria, should ideally comprise at least 80% of the total gut bacteria. If you are diabetic, adding probiotics, as either food or supplements, can change things dramatically. Of course, you also need to eat the right diet to feed …

Often, diabetics get the disease by doing exactly that. Too much sugar simply translates into the overgrowth of bad bacteria (like yeast). So, it comes as no surprise that probiotics (good gut bacteria) and diabetes are closely linked.

Probiotic bacteria communicate with and trigger immune responses, not just in the GI tract but throughout the body. Probiotics mediate stress responses and handle blood sugars better, rather than flooding the system when exposed to everyday stressors.

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Obesity and a diet rich in processed, high-fat foods result in insulin resistance, which eventually leads to type 2 diabetes. It leads, also, to less glucose uptake by muscle cells. More sugar is released from the liver, in this situation. The pancreas is also impacted, leading to reduced insulin secretion.

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